SCORING SYSTEM FOR TOP TRAVEL BLOGS by CATEGORIES

SCORING SYSTEM FOR

TOP TRAVEL BLOGS by CATEGORIES PROJECT

Scoring System

For this Top Travel Blogs by Categories Project I have used only well-known statistical web metrics to rank the sites. Like Samuel’s Top 100 Travel Blogs list, I created these five lists solely by ranking those metrics.

I have not used my personal opinion or subjective evaluation in any way, shape or form when plotting the blogs’ rankings.

I used 5 different stats from 4 independent website sources: Alexa, Similar Web, Moz DA, Moz PA and Facebook. All the statistics I used are available online and free to the general public. Anybody can access these metrics to check any website’s stats. (see this page for links to these metric sites)

I’ve used a similar scoring system to Nomadic Samuel’s Top 100 Travel Blogs List, but I skipped two of the stats Sam uses and added one additional stat.

My objective is to create a scoring system that takes into account three main factors used in evaluating the quality & popularity of sites on the web: number of monthly visitors, number of social media followers and number of back-links.

To this end, I’ve used the following stats:

Alex Scores – indication of a website’s monthly traffic, popularity and results in search engines
Similar Web Scores – indication of a website’s monthly traffic, popularity and results in search engines
MOZ DA Scores (Domain Authority) – measures the number of back-links to a site
MOZ PA Scores (Page Authority) – measures the number of back-links to a site
FB fans/followers – social media following

I’ve gathered and tracked these statistics for approximately 400 hundred travel blogs in order to create the five Top Travel Blog Lists by Categories in this Project.

I scored each of the 5 Top Travel Blog Lists separately.

For any given list, I weighed each of the five metrics equally. With 5 metrics in the rankings, each metric contributes 20% of the total score for each travel blog on each list.

However, the total possible points attainable for each of the 5 lists is slightly different. That’s due to the varying numbers of travel blogs involved in each list.

Following are the total possible points for each list:

 

Top 100 Solo Men and Top 100 Solo Female Travel Blogs Lists

I valued each metric with a possible total score of 150 points.

So 5 metrics x 150 = 750 total potential top score.

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Top 50 Couples and Top 50 Family Travel Blogs Lists

I valued each metric with a possible total score of 100 points.

So 5 metrics x 100 = 500 total potential top score.

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Top 20 Group Blogs List

I valued each metric with a possible total score of 100 points.

So 5 metrics x 100 = 500 total potential top score.

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Dealing with Tied Scores

While ranking travel blogs, I quickly found out that tied scores are common with DA and PA scores. I followed Nomadic Samuel’s methods to deal with tied scores. In such cases, I calculated the average points among all blogs with the same DA or PA scores. Then I gave each of those blogs the same average points. Make sense?

For instance, if 3 blogs ranked 77, 78 and 79 on DA scores but they actually each had a DA score of 43, I would rank all 3 blogs with 78 points for DA. (77 + 78 + 79 / 3) That would then be 20% of each blog’s total points.

Why I Chose These 5 Metrics

In fact, there are many statistics that could be used to evaluate a website’s popularity, quality and visitor numbers. The most accurate are Google Analytics. But GA stats are only accessible by the website owner(s).

Other stats include SEM Rush and Compete. However, as far as I can tell, the general public (including myself) can’t access those stats without paying a membership fee to join the companies.

For this project, I’ve chosen metrics that can be accessed publicly, both by myself and anyone else who wants to check them.

As for social media numbers, I chose to use Facebook for several reasons.

Facebook is one of the longest-standing social media platforms. To date, it’s still one of the most important. For both those reasons, almost every travel blog has a Facebook presence. Therefore, nearly every blog has had a chance to build an audience there. And I’m also familiar with the platform.

Several other long-standing social media platforms, like Stumble Upon, seem to be slowly losing popularity, use and relevance.

Instagram, Pinterest and Google+ are much newer platforms. They are all great platforms and may grow more popular and important in the near future. Right now, though, as far as I can tell, a much smaller percentage of travel bloggers have a presence on any one site, as compared to Facebook.

That leaves long-standing Twitter. I have no particular reason for not using this stat. I’m sure it’s a good one. Twitter is a solid social media platform that is still popular, important and relevant. And, like FB, most travel blogs have a presence there.

The only reason I didn’t also include Tw in my rankings is lack of time for tracking one additional stat. Perhaps I will consider using it in future updates of these 5 Top Travel Blogs by Categories.

Want to submit your travel blog?

CLICK HERE TO LEARN HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR TRAVEL BLOG

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Want to check out the Top Travel Blog Lists?

Top 100 Solo Female Travel Blogs

Top 100 Solo Men Travel Blogs

Top 50 Couples Travel Blogs

Top 50 Family Travel Blogs

Top 20 Group Travel Blogs

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CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO MAIN PAGE OF TOP TRAVEL BLOGS PROJECT

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